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Photos & Colors

Photos & Colors

We try very hard to communicate color... (click on the title above to read more)

We try very hard to communicate the colors of our yarns, though we can never do it perfectly...

We always take the yarn photos in the same light with the same background and using the same camera (a Canon EOS model) with its white point adjusted for the lighting. The photo here shows the setup (click here for a bigger view). It also shows the effects of lighting, though. This picture was taken with the white point adjusted for the spotlights on the wall (the yarn to be photographed is in the box on the table, the camera would normally be fixed there too). Such spotlights give a reddish light, so adjusting the camera for them makes the white items lit by the spotlights look white, and the white items in the background lit by daylight from the roof windows look bluish. If you were here, your eyes would adjust to the different lights but they do not know how to adjust to a photo on your monitor... so please bear in mind that when you look at the yarn photos any red items will probably look stronger than in they would in daylight, green ones will look a bit duller. And all of them will look brighter - that is what spotlights are for... imagine the yarn you see is on display in a jewellery shop window...

NOTE THAT SINCE FEB 2008 we have swapped from the spotlight to lab grade D65 strip lighting, which is artificial daylight as used in color labs. This should give colors closer to the ones you will see in daylight, ie less red tinge. But it still doesn't remove any differences in your monitor or lighting :-) This lighting is therefore used with all yarns listed since February 2008, though unfortunately there is no way of checking exactly when a previously listed was added to the site.

Monitors vary too... they must because the comments we get from customers saying that the yarn was darker than the photo are balanced by the ones that say it was lighter... the best viewing is on a good CRT monitor (the old fashioned bulky things), set to color temperature 6500 and about 85% brightness, the worst is on a low grade LCD (as used on budget notebook PCs).

So we do try another way for solid colours. We measure the color with an instrument called a spectrophotometer which measures the reflectance curve of the yarn, and converts that to Lab values under D65 (daylight) lighting. This is all very technical but we have written some software of our own to make this simple. If you have an Online Auction Color Chart (and if you don't we can send you one or you can buy them for a $ or two from here) then you can go to www.freecolortools.com/yarncolors and build a palette of colors you want to compare, or just search from OAC colors (there is a tutorial on the site).

We are still working on all this, and welcome any feedback or suggestions...

AND FINALLY.... we always give refunds or replacements if you don't like the color when it arrives...